Mountains and Memorials

Yesterday, Andrea Eidinger tweeted a post about Vimy Peak in Waterton Lakes National Park, in Southern Alberta. The post appeared on Retroactive, the government of Alberta’s blog for historic places, to mark the centenary of the Battle of Vimy Ridge. Being a First World War historian who grew up in Calgary and spent most weekends hiking up the peaks of Kananaskis Country, I knew of a handful … Continue reading Mountains and Memorials

Letter Rip

At the beginning of the year, I resolved to experiment more with Gephi to explore the possibilities of network analysis in historical research. Prompted largely by the need to organize some classroom activities for my course on the First World War, I delved back into the Canadian Images and Letters Project (CLIP) to scale up my efforts. In my first attempt, I explored the letters of … Continue reading Letter Rip

Hands Across the Sea: Irish and Scottish Battalions in the AIF and CEF

Originally posted on the Four Nations History Network Blog on 8 February 2016. In December 1915, Reverend J.S. MacPherson of Morphett Vale, South Australia, wrote to the State War Council proposing to raise battalions for the Australian Imperial Force (AIF) “representing the National Societies, such as the Caledonian, Hibernian, Welsh and Cornish.”[1] A little over one year into the First World War, voluntary enlistments were tapering off … Continue reading Hands Across the Sea: Irish and Scottish Battalions in the AIF and CEF

Hashtag Commemoration

It’s been fun to observe the centenary of the First World War through twitter and other social media. These forms of communication allow people to experience and share commemorative events in new ways. Attendees at ceremonies can broadcast their thoughts, perspectives, and reactions and people unable to attend the ceremonies in person can use social media to participate from the other side of the world. Tapping … Continue reading Hashtag Commemoration

Making Molehills of Mountains

After an extended hiatus, I’m back to blogging. I’m just settling into my postdoc in Digital History and Pedagogy with the Department of History at the University of Delaware. Over the summer, I corresponded briefly with one of my new colleagues, Barry Joyce, who inquired about the feasibility of building 3-D models from topographical maps so he could use them as a teaching aid in his … Continue reading Making Molehills of Mountains

GIFs for Everyone

[Parts of this post have been assembled out of earlier posts from 2012 and 2013] Last month,the Associate Press and British Movietone announced they were uploading 550,000 films and videos from their archive to YouTube. These new additions will join about 85,000 films uploaded a year ago by British Pathé. This is good news to any historian of modern Britain and the empire, as these films … Continue reading GIFs for Everyone

Playing with Fusion

At the moment, I’m writing a chapter on voluntary contributions from Indigenous communities in Australia, Canada, and New Zealand during the First World War. Any discussion of First Nations enlistments in Canada is bound to include a discussion of the 114th (Brock’s Rangers) Battalion, raised in Haldiman County in Southwestern Ontario. The 114th included two companies of First Nations soldiers, recruited mainly from the Six … Continue reading Playing with Fusion

Imagining War and Peace in the Empire

Originally Posted 8 November 2012 I’ve been struggling to figure out a way to incorporate more of my research into this blog, and with November 11th coming up I think I’ve found a way. While this doesn’t actually have much to do with my actual dissertation, I’ve combed through some of the digitized archival databases in Australia, Canada, and New Zealand to assemble some photographs … Continue reading Imagining War and Peace in the Empire